Installing and Configuring phpMyAdmin on AWS Amazon Linux AMI running Apache2 PHP and MySQL

Installing and Configuring phpMyAdmin on AWS Amazon Linux AMI running Apache2, PHP and MySQL (see the links for instructions on installing each software package).

This is actually really easy, assuming you are using the base version of PHP (5.3.X) from the AWS package repository. YUM has phpMyAdmin as a package and most of the default settings work just fine. The first time I install on an AWS instance it took maybe 15 minutes to complete.

Installing phpMyAdmin

These instructions assume you have already setup an AWS instance and have an SSH client (like PuTTY) available and a SCP client (like WinSCP) to use when editing the configuration files.

  1. Log in to your instance via the SSH client. Transfer to the root user (“sudo su”).
  2. Use YUM to install phpMyAdmin
  3. Press “Y” when it asks if you want to install phpMyAdmin
  4. Open the SCP client and go to the apache2 configuration files directory (default is “/etc/httpd/conf.d”)
  5. Open the “phpMyAdmin.conf” file.
  6. Add an access exception to apache2 authentication protocol. There are three safe ways to allow access to phpMyAdmin;
    1. Allow Exception from a static IP Address Under the Directory tag “/usr/share/phpMyAdmin/”, add the following line at the end of the <IfModule mod_authz_core.c><RequreAny> tag, “Require ip XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX” and the following line at the end of the <IfModule !mod_authz_core.c> tag, “Allow from XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX”. In each situation you should be replace XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX with the actual IP address.
    2. Allow access from a VPN You will need a Virtual Private Network setup already, which is well beyond these instructions. Under the Directory tag “/usr/share/phpMyAdmin/”, add the following line at the end of the <IfModule mod_authz_core.c><RequreAny> tag, “Require ip XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX” and the following line at the end of the <IfModule !mod_authz_core.c> tag, “Allow from XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX”. In each situation you should be replace XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX with the actual IP address.
    3. Use SSL Certificate for authentication These instructions are not complete yet.
  7. Save the edited “phpMyAdmin.conf” file.
  8. Verify the installation occurred correctly by starting/restarting the httpd service (in SSH “service httpd restart”)

Summary of command line inputs

  • $ sudo su
  • $ yum install phpmyadmin
  • …..
  • Do you want to install phpMyAdmin 5.x (Y/N): Y
  • $ service httpd restart

First few lines of phpMyAdmin.conf file with default installation path, edited for access by a single IP address

# phpMyAdmin – Web based MySQL browser written in php
#
# Allows only localhost by default
#
# But allowing phpMyAdmin to anyone other than localhost should be considered
# dangerous unless properly secured by SSL

Alias /phpMyAdmin /usr/share/phpMyAdmin
Alias /phpmyadmin /usr/share/phpMyAdmin

<Directory /usr/share/phpMyAdmin/>
<IfModule mod_authz_core.c>
# Apache 2.4
<RequireAny>
Require ip 127.0.0.1
Require ip ::1
Require ip XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX
</RequireAny>
</IfModule>
<IfModule !mod_authz_core.c>
# Apache 2.2
Order Deny,Allow
Deny from All
Allow from 127.0.0.1
Allow from ::1
Allow from XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX
</IfModule>
</Directory>

Configuring phpMyAdmin

The default configuration of phpMyAdmin needs only a few changes to get it working correctly.

  1. Log in to your instance via the SCP client (like WinSCP)
  2. Open the phpMyAdmin base directory (default AWS installation directory is “/usr/share/phpMyAdmin”)
  3. Open the file “config.sample.inc.php”
  4. Go down to the line “$cfg[‘blowfish_secret’] = ‘XXXXXXXX’;” where XXXXXX is some alphanumeric combination. Add a bunch more letters and numbers within the single quotes.
  5. Go down to the line “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘controlhost’]” and make sure it is uncommented. After it, add “= ‘localhost’;”
  6. The next line should be “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘controluser’]”and make sure it is uncommented. After it, add “= ‘USERNAME’;” where USERNAME is the username you want to log into phpMyAdmin using.
  7. The next line should be “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘controlpass’]”and make sure it is uncommented. After it, add “= ‘PASSWORD’;” where PASSWORD is the password associated with the previously entered username.
  8. Save the file as “config.inc.php”.
  9. Use YUM to install phpMyAdmin
  10. Press “Y” when it asks if you want to install phpMyAdmin
  11. Open the SCP clint and go to the apache2 configuration files directory (default is “/etc/httpd/conf.d”)
  12. Open the “phpMyAdmin.conf” file.
  13. Direct your browser to “http://XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX/phpMyAdmin&#8221; where XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX is the IP address of your server. You should be prompted for a username and login. Enter the pair you just saved in the config file and you should run phpMyAdmin.

Installing the necessary software on an AWS Amazon Linux AMI server

There is a variety of software you will need to get your new AWS web server up and running. You probably already have the desktop clients if you every did any server work previously, the core server software however will need to be installed, depending on your purposes for the server.

This page will be updated from time to time as new installation and configuration guides are added.

Desktop Clients

Software Description Available at: Documentation
PuTTy Free SSH client. Utilizes basic command line style interface www.putty.org TXT version | HTML version
WinSCP Free SCP/SFTP/FTP client for Windows. Offers a graphical user interface to move and edit files. www.winscp.net HTML version

I am bias to Windows software. All of these programs run on Windows XP and Windows 7 (32-bit & 64-bit systems). If you are running a Linux or Mac system….well…they may work. The program’s name link will go to instructions on configuring the software to access your AWS Instance.

Core Server Software

Software Usage Description Documentation
Apache2 Website hosting The basic web server which deals with internet (http/https) traffic to the server. http://httpd.apache.org/
PHP Dynamic Websites (optional)
Requires:Apache2
Scripting language for creating dynamic webpages. Used by most CMS, Wiki & Blog systems to manage content http://www.php.net/
MySQL Database The basic free SQL database server. Used by many CMS, Wiki & Blog systems to store content. http://www.mysql.com/
phpMyAdmin Database Administration (optional)
Requires:Apache2, PHP & MySQL
Graphical, HTML based admin tool for accessing and managing mySQL databases. http://www.phpMyAdmin.net/
Postfix Mail-Transfer-Agent (ie: email server) Accepts and sends email. Versatile and can be used with a variety of database structures. http://www.postfix.com/
Courier Email Client Portal (optional)
Requires:Postfix
Offers a portal to access email via any client, including MS Outlook, Thunderbird & smart phones. Offers IMAP and POP3 systems. http://www.courier-mta.org/
Spamassassin Email Spam filter (optional)
Requires:Postfix
Works with MTAs to prevent spam from arriving on server http://spamassassin.apache.org/
BIND9 DNS Server (optional) DNS server which allows you to create your own dns records. http://www.bind9.net

Note all of these programs are free, and most are open source. All of the installation instructions are specific to the Amazon Linux AMI. This stripped down version of Linux is a special Amazon derivative of Fedora. When I was originally setting up our servers, some of the differences between RedHat, Ubuntu, Debian and this version of Linux drove me crazy, therefore all of these instructions worked on the newest Amazon Linux AMI version (currently 2012.03).